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Ending Striga’s reign with IR maize

 Ending Striga’s reign with IR maizeThe collaborative development of herbicide-resistant maize promises effective integrated management of the Striga weed in Sub-Saharan Africa, increasing crop yields by up to four times and offering millions of farmers a solution to combating this noxious parasitic weed. Click here to download publication [pdf 1,550 k]

Click here to view posting on DFID case studies page

Baseline Study of Smallholder Farmers in Striga Infested Maize Growing Areas of Central Malawi

 baseline malawiThis report presents the results from a livelihood study of smallholder farmers carried out in Striga stricken maize growing areas in four districts of central Malawi namely Dedza, Kasungu, Mchinji and Lilongwe. Maize is the major staple in Malawi and the Central Region as the major maize growing area. Given its pivotal position in the national food basket, maize is marketed in both rural and urban centres. The maize sub-sector has been constrained by many factors of which Striga is among the more significant production constraints. A selective sampling strategy was used to select the four districts from which 40 villages mostly hit by Striga were randomly selected. Seventy-five (75) households in each district were randomly selected for interviews. Click here to download publication [pdf 1,550 k]

Baseline Study of Smallholder Farmers in Striga Infested Maize Growing Areas of Eastern Uganda

baseline studyThis report presents the results of a livelihood study of smallholder farmers undertaken in Striga-infested maize growing areas in four districts of eastern Uganda, namely Tororo, Busia, Budaka and Namutumba. Maize is an important crop in this region but its production has been constrained by a number of constraints of which Striga is ranked first. A structured sampling strategy was used to select the four districts from which 40 villages mostly affected by Striga were randomly selected. Seventy-five (75) households in each district chosen were randomly selected for interviews. Click here to download publication [pdf 1,230 k]

Baseline Study of Smallholder Farmers in Striga infested Maize Growing Areas of Eastern Tanzania

baseline tanzaniaThe report presents findings from a livelihood study of smallholder farmers in Striga-infested, maize growing areas of eastern Tanzania using the Sustainable Livelihood Framework (SLF). The report provides baseline indicators against which the progress of future interventions to control Striga can be objectively measured. The study was conducted in five districts, namely Morogoro, Mvomero, Muheza, Mkinga and Handeni. The selection of districts was based on two criteria; maize being among the major crops and Striga being a major constraint to maize production. The study was conducted in five districts involving a total of 20 villages covering a sample size of 301 households. Click here to download publication [pdf 1,400 k]

Farmer Perceptions of Imazapyr-Resistant (IR) Maize Technology on the Control of Striga in Western Kenya

ir perceptionA perception study aimed at documenting the perceptions of early adopters regarding the IR maize technology and its effectiveness in controlling Striga was done. The perception study involved monitoring the sub-sample (400 households) of 802 households included in the AATF/IITA 2005/06 baseline survey. The baseline farmers had less than one year exposure in using the technology. It also included 434 households experimenting with IR maize technology served by the WeRATE consortium. Their experience with using IR maize was more than one year. The objective of the perception study was to document the level of initial adoption and the perceptions of users at the early stage of their exposure to IR maize. Specifically, the study aimed at: (1) examining the characteristics of IR maize in relation to farmer preferences; (2) assessing the performance of IR maize in terms of productivity changes, advantages and disadvantages; (3) documenting the changes in farm management practices induced by IR maize technology; and (4) assessing the adoption pathways. This was done based on the assumption that a better understanding of the farmer perceptions on the technology will identify preliminary factors that facilitate or impede adoption of IR maize at this early stage of the technology dissemination process and will help address these constraints with a view to enhancing its adoption/adaptation for greater impact on the poor rural farmers. – Click here for publication [pdf 985 k]

Baseline Study of Striga Control using IR Maize in Western Kenya

striga baselinThe report presents the results of a baseline study undertaken to assess the status of Striga damage, the general livelihoods and livelihood strategies of the rural poor in western Kenya. A stratified random sampling method led to the selection of 8 districts, 16 sub-locations, 32 villages and 800 households. A combination of techniques for data collection was used, including literature review, GPS recordings, focus group discussions and interview of individual households. The study revealed that households are small in size and dependency ratio is high. There were about 26% of households headed by females. The level of education is low for the heads of households and all members of farm families. Households are endowed with a multitude of assets for their livelihoods. Maize is the major food crop and a source of cash income. Farmers grow both local and improved (hybrid) maize varieties, but the productivity is low. – Click here for report [pdf 1,454 kb]

Empowering African Farmers to Eradicate Striga from Maize Croplands

strigaThis booklet calls for a comprehensive campaign to eradicate Striga from Africa's maize croplands. Striga is a parasitic weed preying upon cereal crops that has infested 2.5 million hectares of maize. This biological invasion results in economic losses of over US $1 billion per year and is a leading cause of food insecurity and rural stagnation. For decades, Africa's small-scale farmers were powerless to control this menacing plant parasite but recent technological breakthroughs are now available to reverse this situation.
Click here for booklet [pdf 920 kb]

Ua Kayongo Hybrid Maize: The Striga Killer

ua kayongoContents: Mobilising Kenyan farmers; Striga threatens farmers in Kenya;
Know your enemy!; The first line of defense; Conventional Striga management; Introducing Ua Kayongo: the Striga killer; Five easy steps to establish Ua Kayongo; Other benefits from planting Ua Kayongo; Questions and answers on Ua Kayongo

Click here for booklet [pdf 1,073 kb]

Launch of STRIGAWAY® (IR-maize) technology for Striga control in Africa

strigawayContents: Background,Striga in Africa, Issues discussed by the participants, Institutional roles, Prioritising the countries, Country specific work plans, Variety recommendation, Available varieties, List of participants

- Click here for proceedings [pdf] 

New Approaches to Controlling Striga Infestation

new approaches to controllin strigaReprint from the November-December 2004 issue of Farmer's Journal describing approaches to Striga control.

- Click here for reprint [pdf]

 

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